Saturday, 12 October 2013

Too Many Quinces??

This is the easiest way I have discovered to use up as many quinces as I can.  Our tree is laden, and I am picking them by the bucket load.


QUINCE JAM/JELLY
This recipe is so simple, but the  preparation time  in washing and cutting up the quinces is considerable! Don't throw out the liquid from the first boil. Use it to make quince jelly (see below).

This is how I prepare the quinces and through doing so many, I find I have got quite quick at the job now!
A good knife and peeler is very important when dealing with quinces.  Once ripe, mine lose their fluffy coats; if yours are still fluffy, wash them well first.
I cut off the two ends to make peeling easier.
It is then very easy to peel quickly.
Cut off the large pieces from the stone and cut into bite-size pieces for cooking.
Then cut off the smaller bits as well and throw all into the saucepan with water.
PREPARATION:
I use about 14 to 30 quinces at a time.

Wash, peel and remove seeds and any dark patches from the quinces. Cut into small chunks and put into a bowl of water to stop the flesh going dark. Drain and transfer to a pot with water with some lemon juice, just to the top of the quince pieces. Cover and bring to a boil over high heat. Boil for 30 minutes, turn off heat, and leave the pot on the stove for minimum of 30 minutes.  If I am busy, I leave over night!
Drain off liquid into another pot to make quince jelly (see below.)
To make jam, I mashed the fruit with a potato masher, the consistency should be similar to chunky apple sauce. Transfer to a large saucepan; I use jam sugar, add the correct weight of fruit to the directions on the sugar packet and bring to the boil with juice from one orange.  Cook for time stated on the packet and put into sterilised hot jars, put the metal lids on immediately and as the vacuum is formed over the next while, the lids should go "pop".

OR add sugar to taste. We do not like it very sweet, ¾ of a cup is enough for us and 1 bottle of cider or rose wine; I prefer the cider!   Bring to the boil and simmer for about 5 minutes.  I then bottle into hot jars from the oven and seal immediately.   Great for adding to fruit salads or eating just as it is, with crème fraiche or ice cream.  Most of my fruit this year has been bottled this way, as I still have jam from last year!!

QUINCE JELLY (Easy)
Make this recipe with the liquid from quince jam. Because quinces have high pectin content, it will set to a jelly without any additives. 

INGREDIENTS:
2 measures of liquid from the quince jam recipe by quantity (not weight)
1 measure of sugar by quantity (not weight) (I used ordinary sugar for this as the jelly sets so easily)
Juice from one or two lemons. 

PREPARATION:
Strain the liquid into a large saucepan (I use a paper filter in a funnel), stir in sugar and boil over high heat until it is a rich looking colour and about ¾ of the amount you started with; this takes about 40 minutes to 1 hour.  I find that when the colour looks a rich pink/ red, it is ready.  Skim off any foam and pour into hot jars with an airtight lid.   I have only once poured too soon and it did not set.  I poured the liquid  back into the saucepan and boiled it up for another 20 minutes and second time around it was perfect!

I also experimented this year with a cake which was delicious.  I based this recipe on Mary’s recipe at One Perfect Bite see HERE 

DIANE'S QUINCE CAKE

3 large quinces, peeled and each cut into four large pieces, plus the smaller bits off the centre stone.
1 cup sugar
2 tablespoons honey
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
2/3 cup margarine, softened
4 eggs
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
2 cups all-purpose flour
1 heaped teaspoon bicarbonate of soda

Directions:
1) Put the quince into a saucepan and just cover with water, add cinnamon and honey.  Bring to boil and simmer gently until just tender.   Remove the largest pieces to cool on a plate.  The smaller pieces see 3)*


2) When ready to proceed, preheat oven to 180C. Generously grease or spray a 9 x 5-inch loaf pan. (I lined the bottom of pan with parchment paper and then greased the parchment paper as well)
3) Cream butter and sugar in another bowl until mixture is light and fluffy. Add eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition. Add vanilla. Combine flour and bicarb and gradually add to creamed mixture and beat until smooth.  *Fold the smaller drained pieces of quince into the batter and mix well.

4) Transfer batter to prepared pan. Push the larger bits of quince slices vertically into batter, spacing them over the cake. Bake for 1½ to 1¾ hours or until a toothpick inserted near centre comes out clean. Cool for 10 minutes before removing from pan to a wire rack. Serve hot or cold. Yield: 8 to 10 servings.

N.B. I covered the cake with cooking paper for the first hour, as I did not want it to burn!

Nice eaten as cake or as a dessert with crème fraiche.  As the cake is quite moist, it will only keep for about a week out of the fridge.

You can see how dark the fruit goes even in water...
As soon as it starts to heat up the fruit will go pale again.
Quince jelly and last years's jam.
Quince fruit ready for eating.

The cake was yummy.

I am now off to the kitchen with yet another large saucepan full of quinces....

76 comments:

  1. Last night for the first time I enjoyed quince. It was served as a paste along a cheeseboard, t was delicious. I need to do a little more research about quinces and see if they can be grown in my part of the country.

    Velva

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    1. Velva I have spent most of my life without quinces, I now realise what I missed out on!! I have still got some medlar paste left from last year which is similar to quince paste and it is just amazing with cheese. A bit more trouble to make but the result is so worth while. The medlars are now dropping so they are next to do!!! It never seems to stop! Have a wonderful Sunday and I hope you find some quinces in your area. Diane

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  2. Mmmmmmm! You've just reminded me how delicious quince jam can be. It's years since I've tasted it. We don't see too many quinces round here. Thanks for the memory!!

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    1. Richard I can send you some if you want...... Have a great weekend and thanks for the comment. Diane

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    2. Thank you for your very kind offer, Diane, which is much appreciated. I think that my wife might be a little disturbed if I started receiving presents from a lady in France, so I'll pass on this occasion!

      Hoping you're getting better weather than we are - still wet and windy here!

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    3. Ha ha, I will be over in December I could deliver in person :-)

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  3. That cake looked rather nice! Do you yet see an end in sight to the autumn preserving?

    I used to keep quince quarters peeled, skinned and parboiled in the freezer to cook with lamb or pork stews.
    I don't remember which recipe started me on that but I think it was when I couldn't get dried pears on moving to France.

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    1. Fly I find the bottled quince easy to do and I can use it for anything from cooking with meat to eating just as fruit. It also does not take up freezer space of which I am limited. The cake was very yummy, we both loved it and I will be making again very soon. Have a good Sunday, both of you. Cheers Diane

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  4. Am very impressed with your effort, and will instruct Lester to plant a couple of quince trees when the time is right!

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    1. Vera I now wonder what i did before I discovered quinces. They are just the best fruit ever and so versatile. Have a great Sunday Diane

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  5. This may sound stupid but what the heck is a Quince. They look a lot like an apple. I have never heard of a quince.

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    1. Horst the quince is a small to medium, deciduous tree that bears a fruit, similar in appearance to a pear, and bright golden-yellow when mature. The fruit is edible only when cooked. They are quite delicious and quince jelly with meat is scrumptious. Have a good day Diane.

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  6. I too am very impressed with all of the different things you've done with quince. I don't believe I've ever tasted quince. Hmmm
    Sam

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    1. Sam you have no idea what you are missing, the taste is amazing. Quince jelly is very special :-) Take care Diane

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  7. No wonder you're so busy, by the bushel full. Never ate quince.

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    1. Gaelyn you will have to come and visit France and then you can try out Quince fruit and jelly, it is wonderful, The tree just never seems to let up, I bring in a bucket full of fruit and the amount on the tree looks the same! Have a good day Diane

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  8. Thanks for sharing Diane , I am not sure I have ever seen a Quince , let alone cooked with them .. you have to keep busy somehow LOL lOL ,, take care and keep cooking :-) xoxo

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    1. Hi Anne another reason to visit to try out this amazing fruit. You can grow them in the UK though and would probably be able to get some at the market. Take care Diane oxo

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  9. I love quince. The smell is so wonderful when I cook them with apples. I don't add any sugar as the natural sugar of the apples is enough. (I don't peel them). Too bad the season is so short in Southern California.

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    1. Our apples this year have not been good so I gave up the idea of cooking them together, I agree they make a fantastic combination. I have always peeled ours as I find the skin takes longer to cook. Maybe a different type to what you have. Our neighbour offered me some of theirs one year, they were horrible to cut up or do much with as they were all knobbly, very odd! Bonne journée, Diane

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  10. That's a good recipe for quince jam Diane. My ex-girlfriend's mother - with whom I remain good friends - uses a similar one and always saves me a jar of hers because she knows I like it a lot (I put it on Weetabix too, curiously, in place of sugar).

    Oh, and why do you use hot jars to put it into?

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    1. It is also an easy recipe, if you pop down this way I will give you a couple of jars :-) I always sterilise my jars in the oven before putting anything into them, fruit, jam, jelly etc. I also have seen cold jars crack when hot ingredients are poured into them. Keep well Diane

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  11. I have never seen a quince. I'm not certain they're grown here. Your jam, cake and canned fruit look wonderful.

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    1. Marjie I think they grow most anywhere, but they are more an old fashioned type fruit as are the medlars which we have and are not commonly grown any more. I have no idea why as they are quite delicious though they cannot be eaten uncooked. Keep well Diane

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  12. Oh wow, I have never tried that fruit before. It look like guava!

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    1. Hi Rose it is nothing like a guava. It is much bigger, similar in appearance to a pear, and bright golden-yellow when mature. It has one large stone/pip in it and it is not edible unless cooked. It is then quite delicious :-) Have a good day Diane

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  13. I really have to try this. You certainly have simplified the preparation and your cake sounds wonderful, Dianne. Have a great week. Blessings...Mary

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    1. Mary there are many different recipes for quince but I find this by far the quickest and easiest when there are so many as I have this year. The quince paste is yummy as well but I have not got the time. The fruit is so delicious, quick and easy to bottle as fruit, and we love it. The juice of it as jelly is also simple so what more could I wish for:-) Have a good day Diane

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  14. I've never had quince or, like Marjie, seen one. It looks like they make tasty jam, jelly, and cake.

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    1. Pam it is one of the nicest fruits ever even if it takes a bit longer than most to prepare. Take care Diane

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  15. I am waiting with bated breath for the Ile de Re photographs. We had a very lovely holiday there once and are thinking about re visiting next year xxxx

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    1. Diane I will get there eventually, just too much going on in the kitchen. I still have our cruise in the Mediterranean in May to write about as well. Just not enough hours in the day!!! Keep well Diane

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  16. Gorgeous! I have never had quince!

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    1. Thanks you so much for your visit and comment, much appreciated. You have cranberries and I have quinces but I think the preparation of cranberries is a lot easier :-) Have a good day Diane

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  17. I love quinces, normally in Fall I make quince paste love this and the cake look delicious!!

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    1. Gloria I just find the paste, lovely as it is, takes up too much time. The medlars are starting to drop and I will probably make paste out of them, I think they are (if possible) better as paste than the quinces. Take care Diane

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  18. I would love to have your problem :) I love how they turn such a rich and rosy colour with processing.

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    1. Sarah how I wish I could send you some, I would be delighted to pass on a few bucket loads :-) Have a good week Diane

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  19. Quelle variété de recettes avec les coings. Ma préférée est toujours la gelée de coings. Mais le fruit entier cuit au four avec un peu de sucre est aussi délicieux!
    Bonne semaine à vous!

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    1. Lucie, merci pour votre commentaire. Nous aimons aussi la gelée de coing. Bonne semaine. Diane

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  20. Oh my! You are so industrious! To make jam is something I have always wanted to do...but haven't. But you are making me wonder what I've been missing!
    So glad to be in touch again... I had missed blogging so much!
    Blessings,
    Ann

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    1. Ann it is very time consuming and all the fruit is ready at the same time!! Never the less we do enjoy the results. Take care Diane

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  21. I don't think I've seen a quince here in Perth Diane, of course that doesn't mean there aren't any :)) Will definitely keep my eyes open next shopping day.

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    1. I have just looked them up and it seems they are in season in Australia between March and May. You will have to wait until next year it seems :-)) Take care Diane

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  22. It all looks yummy and thank you for the recipe. How lovely to have your own Quince trees!

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    1. Denise we only have one tree and I have to say thank goodness. One is more than enough to cope with and as the neighbours either have them, or do not have the time to cook them it is not easy to give them away!! Have a good week Diane

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  23. La pâte de coings est délicieuse aussi.
    A bientôt

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    1. J'aime aussi pâte, mais il faut plus de temps pour cuisiner! Nous avons tellement de coing j'ai besoin d'être rapide. Je vais faire le pâte de nèfles qui sera bientôt prêt. Bonne semaine. Diane

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  24. What do you mean by a "measure"?

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    1. Hello and thanks for your comment on my quinces. A measure can be anything you like. e.g. 2 cups of juice to 1 cup of sugar or 1 litre of juice to 1/2 a litre sugar. Hope this explains the issue. Have a good day Diane

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  25. I am terribly jealous you have all those quinces. I love them. A bowl on the dining room table makes the whole room smell divine. Here they are rare and quite expensive so I don't get too many. Made quince Ratafia a few years ago and it's still delicious. Bravo for all that quince.

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    1. Deana I made some Ratafia yesterday though I used Rum instead of Vodka, will let you know in a months time what it is like :-) Have a good weekend, Diane

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  26. Hello Diane - The aroma in your home from cooking all those quinces must be amazing, and then you have the resulting jars of jewel-like glory to gaze upon too! Sending care, love and huggles, Michelle xxx

    (Yes, I'm still here however Zebby Cat sadly "went to the rainbow bridge" in August. I should be back blogging soonish)

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    1. Hi Michelle, so very sad and sorry to hear the news. You must feel very lost with out him around. It will be good to see you back blogging, mine are few and far between at the moment due to lack of time! Have a good day Diane xox

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  27. I am not surprised the kitchen is taking priority, I wonder how the quince tree in our Italian orchard has done this year.

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    1. Linda many bottles later and the tree seems to have as many on as when I started. Everyone here has a tree so they are not interested in having any! Keep well Diane

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  28. I had to look for the translation of quince and now I know I just love what you made. Besides, it looks absolutely delicious.

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    1. JM they are one of the best fruits ever and so many people have never heard of them, very sad! Have a good day Diane

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  29. Can there ever be such a thing as too many quinces? :) I LOVE them and will be over on the next flight to help you eat them. LOL!! That is something I really miss here. As a child, almost everyone had hedges of them in their yards, now you do not see them anywhere and only now and then can I find them in a shop to buy. I eat them any way they are prepared but most of all I like them fresh with salt sprinkled on them!! Now look what you have done!! My mouth is watering and I am drooling!! LOL!!

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    1. Joan we just love quince in any form though I admit to never having tried them raw. I was told they are inedible in the raw form Now I am going to rush outside with the salt pot and try them out :-))) Have a wonderful week, Diane

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  30. A quince is something I have never tried - in fact I don't remember seeing them in the shops either. I must have a proper look the next time I am shopping. You have been busy with all your jelly and cake making. It all sounds delicious too :))
    Hope you are well and have a lovely weekend.

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    1. Ellie you do not know what you missing, it it one of the best fruits ever. Hope you have a great Sunday and a good week as well. Keep well Diane

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  31. Replies
    1. Freda I think I love them pretty much any way. We have been eating quince as fruit desert every single night for the past month, the easiest way to do them. Meanwhile the shelves are heaving with confiture , jelly and fruit. Something to enjoy over winter :-) Have a good day. Diane

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  32. Great and yummy recipe, Diane!
    Quite close to that of my grand-mother's!
    She use to add whole pieces of lemon peel too.
    Thanks for sharing this!
    Keep well!

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    1. Lemon peel sounds like a great addition Noushka I will remember next one I make. Thanks. Take care Diane

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  33. Diane, your jelly and cake look delicious! I've never had quince, not even sure if it is sold in the stores here. I will have to check it out the next time! Have a good rest of the week!

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    1. Pam you have no idea what you are missing, it is the best jelly ever. Hope you have a good weekend, Diane

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  34. This looks delicious, Diane, thank you so much for sharing the recipe! I also love your header!

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    1. Thanks very much for the kind comment. Have a great weekend Diane

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  35. Delicious - do the french eat Quince jelly with cheese like the Brits?! I doubt it :) I always remember how they laughed at the english eating chicken and jam (chicken with cranberry sauce!)

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    1. Annabel I do not know if they eat it with cheese or not. My neighbours, all French, are always very happy when I give them a pot or two, but I suspect they eat it with meat but I may well be wrong! Cranberry sauce goes with most meats so I do not know how they would eat that either. I will have to ask. Have a fantastic weekend Diane

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  36. wow you made lots and can you believe I have never tried quince

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    1. Rebecca I am surprised at how many people do not know what quince is or have not tried it. You don't know what you are missing :-) Have a fab weekend Diane

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  37. hi diane, i am a lil embarass to tell you that i hv never heard of quince...that i hv to google and find out what is that...:)
    you made so much jam! have a good week ahead!

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    1. Lena do not be embarrassed it seems there are quite a few people that do not know what quinces are. You just do not know what you are missing. Quince jam and jelly are amazing and we also love the fruit lightly cooked with a few spices, yum yum. Keep well Diane

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