Thursday, 5 April 2012

Round and About - Pressignac

I visited Pressignac almost a year ago now, on one of my trips back from  Limoges airport, having dropped Nigel off for his return to the UK to work.  Thank goodness these trips are now at an end!!

The town of Pressignac is quite close to Chassenon where there are many Roman remains see HERE. It's situated in an elevated position and well served by watercourses, presumably the factors which caused the village to be established originally. The countryside bears the signs of the  meteorite which crashed in this area 200 million years ago. A nearby hamlet marks the position of the exact centre of the 20km (12 mile) diameter crater which it created. See the post on nearby Exideuil HERE.

The population of Pressignac is currently around 400, and in common with other country towns and villages, the population has been falling in recent years.  

On arrival in the little village, the very first thing that I came across was a beautiful carving.  I assume that it is one of the carvings done by  Canadian wood carvers, who visit this the Charente each year- see HERE.

The carved workman was situated next to the local Mairie, as you can see below. The building looked much newer than the remainder of the village, but it could have been restored. Anyway, the French do like to maintain their public buildings!

I walked on down a small road, which gave me a view of the church

and directly in front of me was the war memorial.  Every little (or large) village in France seem to have one, as so many country people gave their lives in the Great Wars.

Walking on a little further, I came the church, Eglise Saint-Martin.

The church was built in the 12th century using local materials, chiefly granite and stone  formed in the meteorite strike.  The architecture is influenced by the style of the abbey at nearby Lesterps, into which diocese this church falls.  Fortifications and other features dating from the 14th and 17th centuries can also be seen.

a small side door

on entering the opened door, I was left open mouthed at this beautiful vaulted ceiling. I am always amazed how they managed to build such beauty in years gone by, without the equipment that we have today.

To the side was the old font


The altar,
and at the sides these beautiful artistic features

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Walking back outside, the first thing that took my eye were the three timber poles. No, don't ask me what they are for, as I have no idea!  Maybe to tie your horse up to, the smaller the horse, the lower you go down the rail!  Perhaps it is just to stop you parking there, or perhaps left there temporarily for some restoration work!

To the left was this map for walkers which may be of some interest. Walking is quite important in country French life and walking trails are well organised, each trail having a reference number and all recorded on large scale maps on sale at stationers.

On walking around a little more, I spotted several more views.  I loved these beautifully kept gardens and the village was spotless.

A view down the main street heading out of the village

A little further out of town on the other side, these two barns were for sale. They looked to be in good condition, so would make great  conversions for housing.

On again, this barn was home to a small animal trailer, and all the owner's prizes were attached to the outside wall for all to see. They were obviously very proud of their winnings.

 All the prizes, and many were firsts, were won at local shows during the 1970's.  The winning animals are not mentioned on the shields, but my guess from the size of their trailer, is that the animals in question were sheep!!

Retracing my steps, more lovely buildings were in view and you can see how well looked after most of them are. Note the large grape vine on the barn! Many country people make their own wine.

A sign from the past on this derelict building

and back at the car, I saw across the road what I presume to be the remains of an old well.

Just as I was about to leave, I looked over the hedge, and there was the town's little graveyard, with the usual lavish family vaults.

with many memorials, this one of the First World War.

I hope that you enjoyed your walk with me around this lovely little village on a warm sunny day. 

For further information see http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pressignac, thanks for this is to Jean-Baptiste BERLAND who has kindly given me the link to his write up.

To all of my followers who celebrate Easter, I wish you a very Happy Easter and a relaxing weekend.

98 comments:

  1. What a lovely Easter walk - thank you for sharing!

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  2. As ever Diane, this walk was such a pleasure.
    If I was there, I would have also stopped and had coffee and enjoyed the sunshine on my face. Were there any cafes in there?
    Also, how wonderful that Nigel is there with you and you don't have to stay alone or say good bye any more. Enjoy the spring and your walks together.

    Red

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  3. Thanks for the tour. I just noticed your new photo. Very lovely. Enjoy your weekend. Susan

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  4. Lovely photos! I especially like the view of the church down the little street! I hope you have a good Easter weekend:)
    ~Anne

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  5. Thank you for this informative walk with you Diane ...

    The rock work on the Church is beautiful and that Arch - yes, it does make one wonder how they did it.

    On War Memorials, due to the fairly large German-speaking population, in the town of Tsumeb, Namibia is a memorial to those who fell on both sides of the conflict - each year the MOTHS and Alte Kameraden would honour the dead together ...

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  6. 1st time here.. loving your blog! :) Its great to see so many wonderful photographs!
    Your newest follower,
    Kavi
    Edible Entertainment

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  7. I always love the tours of your area. The buildings are so old and have so much history! Beautiful!

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  8. Hello Diane:
    We have so enjoyed this tour of what we imagine to be a very typical, small French village which clearly has much of interest. It all seems very quiet, but perhaps you deliberately omitted people and cars.

    We too wish you much joy and happiness this Eastertide.

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  9. What a fantastic find, very interesting to be able to enjoy the walk by proxy!

    I reckon the awards are for horses: juments = mares and there are references to espèces chevalines.

    Thanks for sharing > Tim

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  10. Thank you for the tour of the quaint village. I enjoyed it. Happy Easter

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  11. Thank you for the lovely little tour. I'm always amazed that such small villages can have the most beautiful churches, especially knowing the cost it must have been.

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  12. I love these fantastic little villages, also love your tours. The old world churches are fantastic. Happy Easter.

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  13. Cuisine de Provence, glad you enjoyed it. Take care Diane

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  14. Boye By Red, no there were no cafes that that I saw but there was a boulangerie I think on the right in the main street.
    Yes it is good that we do not have this back and forth all the time and that we are together. Keep well Diane

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  15. Susan thanks for the kind comment, have a great weekend. Diane

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  16. Anne I also liked that view, it was a pretty little village though. Diane

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  17. Graham the stone work in that little village was really good, and they obviously have a lot of pride in the restoration of the places there. I was impressed. Diane

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  18. Kavi thanks for the visit and the kind comment. Thank you for following.
    I have tried to visit your blog but my anti virus will not allow me into it as it says you have a virus. Sorry.
    I will try again in a few days. Diane

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  19. Pam thanks, glad you enjoyed the tour. Have a great weekend Diane

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  20. Jane and Lance, no I have not deliberately left out anyone. The flights to the UK always used to leave late morning so I was at this village around lunch time. The French always disappear from 12h00 until 14h00 :) They have the right idea.
    Have a great weekend. Diane

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  21. Tim I think you are right, but the trailer would never have been large enough to carry one horse, unless it was a shetland. Maybe over the years they have sold the original trailer.
    It was a really pretty little village and I really enjoyed the walk around.
    Diane

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  22. MARCO PASHA thanks for the comment and I am glad you enjoyed the walk. Take care Diane

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  23. Horst this was one of the best small churches that I have seen, but the whole village that I could see was in pretty good condition. Enjoy your weekend. Diane

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  24. backroadjournal this little church was gorgeous and the cost of restoration must have been high. The French seem to be happy to spend money on their old buildings which is good. Thanks for the visit and the comment. Diane

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  25. It's a really pretty village, and the sunshine makes it even more so!

    I like your new picture; Nigel must have been playing with the camera.

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  26. Marjie I agree what a difference a bit of sun makes!
    Yep, Nigel was playing with my camera, he has one of his own but I cannot remember the last time he used it! Diane

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  27. Great virtual walk round the village. Loved the photo of the little side door in the church--it has such lovely late gothic details.

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  28. Niall and Antoinette, glad you liked the little door while walking around the village. It has great details,m I also loved it. Diane

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  29. It is amazing what you see if you are sharp eyed
    when you walk around a village!

    Enjoy the Easter weekend.

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  30. Yet another lovely French village. The churches are so impressive. I think the barn for sale would make an awesome home.

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  31. I enjoyed this tour so very much! The pictures are fantastic and the 12th century church reminds me a bit of the 12th century church in our village, which is now under rennovation. I agree, the door is an exquisite gem of a thing! I also like your new profile picture very much!

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  32. Diane love the pictures, all look georgeous
    I whish you a nuce and happy Easter dear Diane!

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  33. love these little villages and I also love the old churches :-) that salmon mousse looks amazing I made one for new years yum, have a fun easter sweet Dianne

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  34. Thank you very much, my dear friend Diane, for the interesting photo- excursion!
    Very nice village, clean, tidy, quiet!
    Thanks for your wishes!
    I wish you a happy Easter, with good health and joy!

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  35. cheshire wife when I drive somewhere I see very little, when I cycle I am surprised at what I missed in the car, when I walk even more things appear! Have a great weekend. Diane

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  36. Gaeylyn, It would make a great conversion. Both barns looked in good condition and in a quiet village what a perfect place to be. Diane

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  37. The Broad, there are some amazing buildings around in France and they seem to have somehow survived 100's of years despite what life has thrown at them. Have a great Easter. Diane

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  38. Gloria thanks for the comment. Hope that you also have a great Easter. Diane

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  39. Rebecca glad you enjoyed the photos around the village. That salmon mousse certainly went down very well here :) Take care Diane

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  40. Magda the village was in lovely condition and spotless. Have a great Easter and enjoy the break. Diane

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  41. Quite beautiful!
    The overall impression is the neatness and brightness of the place!
    Lovely pictures, Diane!
    Cheers!

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  42. Ce village représente tellement cette France profonde et tellement belle.
    Merci pour cette ballade.
    Joyeuses Pâques et à bientôt

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  43. Another delightful town to have the opportunity to explore virtually with you Diane. You certainly live in a lovely area of France. Enjoy a peaceful Easter weekend.

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  44. Nadji. Merci pour votre visite et commentaire. A bientôt. Diane

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  45. Linda this was a little village that I think I would have been very happy living in, I loved it there. Thanks for the visit and hope that you have a great weekend. Diane

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  46. This is another lovely French village. It looks so clean and tidy. The church interior looks wonderful. Amazing what they could do in days gone by.
    Thanks again for another lovely tour.

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  47. Ellie this was one of my most favourite visits to any village, there was something very special about it. Glad you enjoyed. Diane

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  48. Diane, another wonderful walk with you, and enjoying all these amazing photos!

    I love your new photo, you are stunning!!

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  49. Lyndsey, glad you enjoyed the walk. Thanks for the comment on the photo, Nigel just managed to get a good shot:) He always complains that I am always frowning!!! Diane

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  50. Looks very classic.. Another heritage that should be preserved..

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  51. Diane,

    Thank you so much for introducing us to places we may otherwise never know of. I'm absolutely fascinated by the beauty and history of all the gorgeous places you share with us.

    P.S. I hope you and Nigel are well?

    I took a little break to recover while I'm finally on medication for the complications caused after having Barrett, and to spend time with my little cub and husband (as, sadly, they were much neglected while I was sick). I'm quite a lot better, and ever so grateful. Thank you so much for your care and concern, friend.

    We have another friend in common, Rebecca of Chow and Chatter, who, just the other day, I saw mentioned your blog on her facebook page and we both espoused on what a lovely person you are!

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  52. Gorgeous, as usual!
    Happy Easter!
    Blessings,
    Ann

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  53. Hi Diane .. beautiful village - gosh I wish ours were as clean .. and all that history tied up - it's fascinating to see - and the respect that everything is held in - love it .. these are great little tours .. and I love the idea of the walks.

    Your photo is great - I agree .. enjoy your Easter together and I hope that you're both feeling more cheerful with life .. here's to a decent Spring and summer - Hilary

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  54. A lovely walkabout the town! Thanks for sharing! I always enjoy seeing the villages in different regions of France as each region tends to have its own architecture style and obviously local building materials and weather influence as well.

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  55. Thanks Diane for the lovely photos and tour of Pressignac. Only 1 more week and we can visit the village ourselves :)x

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  56. Ree I am sorry about all the complications you had before, and after, but I am glad to hear that you are getting better once more. It is good though that Barret is doing well despite it all.

    I have steered clear of Facebook but it is good to know that you talk about me there:)

    I still have the cough that has been pestering me since October, and despite many visits to the specialist it lingers on! Nigel is a lot more relaxed since he has been in France, but I don't think he will relax completely until we have all the paper work sorted out with the move here. I am sure your husband would agree with me - the French love lots of paper work and nothing is that simple!!

    Take care Ree and keep well. Hugs Diane

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  57. Anne thanks for visiting. I hope that you have a blessed Easter. Take care Diane

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  58. Hilary I find most villages in France are fairly clean and tidy but this was exceptional. Obviously a lot of restoration work had been done and the inhabitants were looking after it.
    I agree here's to spring and summer and a bit of rain to keep the garden growing, but not storms!
    Keep well Diane

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  59. chcmichel yes it amazes me even locally, how the architecture can change from one area to the other. Also as you say what local building materials are available. I love the places around you and I home we may come that way some time to see them for ourselves. Diane

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  60. Kerry the time is going fast for you now. Safe trip over and maybe we will hear from you while you are here. Take care Diane

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  61. This is another spectacular e-tour Dianne! Beautiful shots!

    Happy Easter.

    Rose

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  62. chubskulit, thanks Rose for the kind comment, glad you enjoyed. Diane

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  63. What a lovely village. I always enjoy seeing the Roman ruins. It's hard for me to believe that they were actually here.

    Love your new photo Diane. So elegant. Happy weekend.
    Sam

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  64. I love these villages you take us through. They are at once the same and yet each is unique and seem sto have an identifying characteristic all its own. I love the stone barns in today's photos. I hope you have a wonderful weekend. Blessings...Mary

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  65. beautiful architecture lovely pictures
    regards

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  66. Awh Diane I am all caught up now, with the posts I missed due to my college workload, but I am glad I have finished my visit with another walk.

    I really enjoyed your photographs of the church the most. The interior is so peaceful and beautiful, very spiritual to me. I would like to attend a Mass there.

    I think I would like to buy that derelict building with the old Singer signage on it!

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  67. I enjoyed the tour through the village. Beautiful.

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  68. Dolly you have done a lot of catching up! Glad you enjoyed finishing off with a walk. This little church was quite beautiful, and very calm and peaceful inside.
    I hope if you renovate that building you will leave the singer sewing machine sign there LOL. Hope you had a peaceful Easter. Diane x

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  69. Christine's Pantry, glad you enjoyed the walk around the village. Take care Diane

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  70. Oh yes, the sign will remain, as I have a passion for collecting vintage signs, perfume bottles etc etc so it will be quite safe and cherished :)

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  71. Dolly I am so pleased to hear it will stay put :) Diane

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  72. Torviewtoronto Thanks for the visit and the comment. Take care Diane

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  73. Mary I agree they are all quite similar, but each one seems to have a different place in history. Those barns would make a beautiful home. Take care Diane

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  74. Sam, it makes me wonder how the Roman remains just 'disappear'. The nearby ones at Chassenon were only discovered in the 50's and since, with much work and excavation, have now almost become a small town again. Diane

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  75. Thank you for visiting belgium on this easter monday morning, Diane !
    you look fabulous in your new picture !

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  76. very interesting & lovely cliks
    thanks for sharing dear..;)

    Tasty Appetite

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  77. Thanks for the lovely walk around this beautiful little French village. It is like out of a movie.

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  78. This is Belgium, Thanks for the very kind comment, you make me feel so good:) Diane

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  79. Jay thanks so much for the visit and the comment. So pleased that you enjoyed the photos. Take care Diane

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  80. All photos are wonderful, great job, Diane! The name Pressignac rang a bell, but I haven't found out why so far...

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  81. diane b you have got it so right, the place was like out of a movie, I had not thought of that.

    Thanks so much for your visit and your comment, hope to see you back sometime. Diane

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  82. JM, let me know when the bell rings louder and you come up with an answer LOL. Diane

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  83. Hy Diane,
    thanks for stopping by & your wonderful comments.
    btw...curd or yoghurt is the same ..hope you can find it in any Indian stores in France. do giv a try ..:)
    Tasty Appetite

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  84. Thank you for the tour. I always love seeing your photos from your walks. They are always so interesting.

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  85. Jay, Yoghurt is not a problem. but where we live in rural France there are no Indian or Chinese shops. The supermarkets have a very small section for International foods but it is VERY limited. I will try it with plain Yoghurt and see how it goes. Thanks Diane

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  86. Words Of Deliciousness I am really glad that you enjoy the small trips around France. Plenty more to come in future posts. Diane

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  87. hi diane, i have enjoyed going thru the your post. It's a nice little town and i'm quite suprised to see the inside of the church is so pretty in a little small town.

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  88. nice walk as always, maybe you will start missing your trips to the airport !?

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  89. I really enjoyed the tour, Diane! The age of the churches and all always amaze me---so different from here. And I've noticed since I've been following you for a good while, all the war memorials in the towns, each one unique. Thanks for the history lesson!

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  90. lovely village and lovely photos. I always have the same thought as you - how could they have built such phenomenal buildings with such minimal equipment by our standards - amazing!

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  91. Lena many of the small towns have these beautiful churches. Most of them are very, very old and the towns/villages where much bigger in all likelihood in those days. It is good though that they have been restored and preserved so well. Diane

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  92. This is Belgium, I will not miss the trips to the airport as it always meant Nigel was returning to the UK. If I want to go for a drive now I can and in any direction I feel like it:) Diane

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  93. The Café Sucré Farine, I would love to go back in time and watch the people building some of these massive, but beautiful building to see how they did it :) Diane

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  94. Pam there just do not seem to be new churches around, or certainly not around here. They are all ones restored from many years ago. Yes you are right the war memorials change from town to town but they all have them. Take care Diane

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  95. Great pictures :-) We drive through this village all the time but have never noticed half of the sites. Will be sure to take more notice now
    x

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  96. La Belle Vienne. Louise it is worth stopping and having a look around. It is very small, but has a lot going for it as you can see from the photos I have taken. The church is certainly worth a visit just to see the architecture alone. Keep well, Diane

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  97. Hello! If you want more informations about Pressignac, you could read this article I have wrote on Wikipedia (in French, sorry!): http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pressignac

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    1. Many thanks, I have put a link on the post as well. I appreciate your interest. Diane

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