Friday, 30 July 2010

Massignac (Part 2 final)

As yesterday turned out to be a busy day at home, I decided that I would post Massignac part 2 now, so the two posts are together.  Thursday was occupied with washing, making courgette pickle, courgette and ginger jam, and freezing beans.  As you will have guessed, the courgettes and the beans in the garden are doing extremely well!!
This is the church, the steeple of which you can see  in the first photo of the previous post. 
A closer view of the door
A peek inside
at the stained glass window.

The War Memorial 1914 - 1918


A small village street.
with an unusual wooden fronted house.
Yet another small village lane
I thought that the elaborate balustrade around this little balcony was quite interesting.  The date over the door is 1900, but I am sure that the blind on the doorway is a later addition! 
I was curious to know what might be behind this door.

as I was with this one as well.

30 comments:

  1. What a pretty village, I really like the stone used for building. Thank you for stopping and photographing such a pleasant spot.

    I'm already thinking about what vege to grow over our next summer wshile enjoying reading about your abundant harvesting. Huggles from me and snores from Zebby, Michelle xxx

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  2. It's a beautiful church. The lanes in the village sure look narrow. Can people actually drive thru there?

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  3. So many War Memorials, aren't there? It is a horrible reminder of how many were lost in Europe. They are lovely though, as are your many doors... I do love unusual doors!

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  4. It really is a charming village. I love and admire your eye for detail. You'd make an excellent tour guide. I hope you are having a great day. Blessings...Mary

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  5. Hi and good morning,

    This village looks delightful. This little church is lovely, and its doors are open inviting all to come in. What are behind the other doors of the town, were they storage facilities?

    Every time I come to your site and see the picture you posted of the Charente River, I am reminded of something but have not figured it out (hate that). This morning it came to me. Waterhouse's painting of "The Lady of Shallot," inspired by Lord Tenneyson's poem of the same name.

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  6. What a beautiful churck - I love the stained glass windows.

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  7. Michelle all the old buildings in France are made out of stone our house included. Masses of stone about so why make bricks! Our walls are about 3 foot wide so very cool in summer. Once warm in winter it seems to hold the heat. Diane

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  8. Hi Gaelyn, it is amazing what one can drive through. Our lane is very narrow and the truck which collects the weekly rubbish makes it through with a couple of inches to spare on either side:) Diane

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  9. longpastremembered, there are war memorials everywhere in France. Yes it is a reminder, but because there are so many you get used to them! I have lots of pictures of doors, when I go back to the UK for winter watch out for doors taken earlier in the year. Diane

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  10. Thanks Mary, it is a lovely village. Have a good day. Diane

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  11. Mya many of those doors are now houses. Our house used to be three barns, which then housed three families. It is now just big enough for the two of us:) Times change!
    It was a very hot day, and many people keep their shutters closed on the sunny side, so some places looked closed up. On the other hand some of them maybe holiday homes. The British have bought many houses over here (when they were cheap) that are only used for holidays. Trouble was it pushed all the prices up and the French youngsters then could not afford them. They are now building many new block houses which are cheaper and easier to maintain - but they sadly do not look part of the French countryside. Or that is my opinion.
    Glad you remembered the Lady of Shallot. Diane

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  12. Pam all the little churches here have so much personality and many have stunning stained glass windows. Diane

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  13. I love the old stone houses. An old Portuguese mason we once employed explained that everything in Portugal is stone because most trees were cut down centuries ago, so it's stone or nothing to build houses. I'd imagine something similar happened in France. After all, it has been settled for a couple of millenia now, right? I showed my son Ryan your pictures, too, and he loved the stained glass window. Chalk up one for Calvert School's History of Architecture course in creating a healthy interest in the boy! Thanks for the tour, Diane!

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  14. I enjoyed touring with your Massignac Part 1 and 2. I wish I'm there to see them, I'm also curious with all those doors... almost weekend, have one!

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  15. Hi Marjie, yes the old buildings have been around for a long time. There was also a lot of stone around so they did not have to move it very far. It sounds like Ryan's school has taught him well and it is good that he has the interest. Diane

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  16. Lani, glad you enjoyed the tour. You have a good weekend as well. Diane

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  17. What a beautiful village! Your pictures are incredible. You have a talent for finding interesting shots for us to enjoy. Thanks!

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  18. Merci beaucoup pour la belle visite du village de Massignac!Je suis heureuse de voir combien vous appréciez les ca^mpagnes françaises.
    Bonne chance pour gagner au Loto!
    Bonne fin de semaine!

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  19. Thanks Linda, not sure there is any talent there, it is what interests me so I hope it does the same for others. Diane

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  20. Lejardindelucie, Merci de vos bons souhaits pour le loto. Bonne fin de semaine. Diane

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  21. I so enjoy seeing parts of France through your eyes .... those little village streets, and quaint buildings are so lovely !

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  22. Lynda the villages here are so beautiful. Each one has something that makes it that bit different. Diane

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  23. Diane, if you don't know what to do with your extra zucchinis, check out Walt's friday's blog (Ken's partner of "living the life in Saint Aignan).
    http://wcs4.blogspot.com/

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  24. Another stroll in this great looking village!
    I like the streets with those stone walls and the old doors!
    Lovely visit of an area of France I hardly know!
    Have a gerat evening, Diane!

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  25. Nadege I check out "living the life in Saint Aignan" most days. Nigel and I just love them pickled though so all extras are going into that. I have not even bothered to freeze this year as we like the pickle so much. Diane

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  26. Carine I am glad you are getting a tour of places that you don't know well. Then of course I do not know your area, there is soooooo much to see in France. I want to go to Italy sometime, and we have friends in Portugal but I think it will take our lifetime to just see France!! Diane

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  27. Diane, the church is so beautiful and all of your photos are great! I love door pics and like you wonder what is beyond. They're all interesting with plenty of character unlike most doors here.

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  28. Hi Pam, thanks for your comments. It was a beautiful little church. Yes the doors here are intriguing:) Diane

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  29. Massignac is gorgeous. Wow! When you've never been out of America, like me, it's hard to really picture the beauty and history that still pulses through places that have been around thousands of years. I'd love to visit one day. I'm planning to move to France with my fiance who lives outside of Paris in about a year. Hopefully I'll get the chance to places like Massignac and Charente. Are they different towns or is one a town within a city?

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  30. Ree - Charente is the department, I guess similar to like you have in the states. Massignac is a small village. Diane

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